Thursday, 28 February 2019

Ike & Tina Turner album by album






(Work in progress. If you like the article, leave a comment or click on an advert - it helps the motivation!)

Tina Turner has a huge, energetic voice, and is a very successful solo singer, though it's her work with Ike Turner that is generally considered (including by me) to be the more enduring.  Ike Turner had been a musician since the 1940s, first with a local big-band the Tophatters, then with his own Kings of Rhythm. In March 1951, when Ike was 19, the band recorded their first song, "Rocket 88", at Sam Phillips studio. The song was written and sung by Jackie Brenston, the band's saxophonist, so it was released under his name. The song was successful enough for Brenston to split off and form his own band.  "Rocket 88" has features that make it a contender for an early rock n rock song (distorted lead guitar, a backbeat,  lyrics about driving a fast car, and loud boogie piano - played by Turner), though for me rock music starts with Chuck Berry's "Maybellene".  After "Rocket 88", Turner acted as a talent scout and session pianist, plus continuing to gig and record with Kings of Rhythm,  at some point changing his instrument from piano to guitar. The band were competent, but had no more hits.  The 18 year old Anna Mae Bullock liked the Kings of Rhythm and wanted to sing with them. She got involved with the saxophonist in the band, and had his baby. She started off as a backing singer, but after stepping up to do some guide vocals for "A Fool In Love" when the band's regular singer failed to turn up for the recording, she became the lead singer, and Ike changed her name to Tina Turner, and changed the band's name to the Ike & Tina Turner Revue.

It is uncertain if and when Ike and Tina actually married (Tina says they got a quickie marriage in Tijuana at some point between 1960 and 1962, and then went to a sex show in a brothel, though dates and documentation appear to be missing) but they did start an intimate relationship at some point after Ike changed her name to Tina Turner when he was still married to the pregnant Lorraine Taylor. Ike and Tina split up personally and professionally in 1976 when Tina left after an argument. Their relationship had been difficult, with arguments and physical fights becoming increasingly common. Tina would later accuse Ike of sustained domestic abuse and controlling behaviour. In interviews when together Ike was often shy and quiet and dominated completely by Tina who would confidently talk for both of them. Ike has openly talked about hitting Tina, but denies being abusive, seeing the hitting as commonplace in society in the Sixties, and that Tina was a difficult person who would hit and provoke him. For many Americans, Ike is more famous as Tina Turner's abusive ex-husband than as a musician in his own right.




Wikipedia:
Ike & Tina Turner were an American musical duo composed of the husband-and-wife team of Ike Turner and Tina Turner. The duo was once considered "one of the hottest, most durable, and potentially most explosive of all R&B ensembles." Their early works, including "A Fool in Love", "It's Gonna Work Out Fine", "I Idolize You" and "River Deep – Mountain High", became high points in the development of soul music, while their later works were noted for wildly interpretive re-arrangements of rock songs such as "I Want to Take You Higher" and "Proud Mary", the latter song for which they won a Grammy Award. They developed an intense, often-ribald, live performance, whose musical spectacle was matched only by the likes of James Brown and the Famous Flames. The duo was inducted to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 1991.


AllMusic:

As husband and wife, Ike & Tina Turner headed up one of the most potent live acts on the R&B circuit during the '60s and early '70s. Guitarist and bandleader Ike kept his ensemble tight and well-drilled while throwing in his own distinctively twangy plucking; lead vocalist Tina was a ferocious whirlwind of power and energy, a raw sexual dynamo who was impossible to contain when she hit the stage, leading some critics to call her the first female singer to embody the true spirit of rock & roll. In their prime, the Ike & Tina Turner Revue specialized in a hard-driving, funked-up hybrid of soul and rock that, in its best moments, rose to a visceral frenzy that few R&B acts of any era could hope to match. Effusively praised by white rock luminaries like the Rolling Stones and Janis Joplin, Tina was unquestionably the star of the show, with a hugely powerful, raspy voice that ranks among the all-time soul greats. For all their concert presence, the Turners sometimes had problems translating their strong points to record; they cut singles for an endless succession of large and small independent labels throughout their career, and suffered from a shortage of the strong original material that artists with more stable homes (Motown, Atlantic, Stax, etc.) often enjoyed. The couple's well-documented marital difficulties (a mild way of describing Ike's violent, drug-fueled cruelty) eventually dissolved their partnership in the mid-'70s. Tina, of course, went on to become an icon and a symbol of survival after the resurgence of her solo career in the '80s, but it was the years she spent with Ike that made the purely musical part of her legend.


Tina Turner's first recording - backing vocals (as Little Ann) on  "Box Top" (1958).

The albums

I'm going through all the albums Ike and Tina made together, or were credited as making together, and listening to them in chronological order. The early recording histories of Ike's Kings of Rhythm and Ike & Tina Turner are confusing to sort out as accurate records were not kept, and various names are used, and songs from recordings are reused on several albums, and some albums are released under different names. I'm figuring it out as I go along, but relying heavily on what appear to be the best sources: WangDangDula and Discogs. I'm giving each album a score to reflect what I feel to be the best Ike & Tina Turner albums in terms of significance, musicianship and listenability. The scores are not given in reference to albums by other musicians such as The Beatles, Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan, etc, as these albums were not made to the same standards - mostly they were quickly and cheaply made (or assembled) as a way of making money, with little apparent thought given to leaving a legacy.

The Soul of Ike & Tina Turner (1961)

Debut album, contains "A Fool In Love"  the song that Anna Mae Bullock sung as a dummy vocal guide for Ike Turner's regular singer when he failed to turn up at the recording session, with the intention that Art Lassiter's voice would be dubbed in later. She gave such a blistering performance, that Ike Turner got given a recording contract on the strength of that one performance, and he changed her name to Tina Turner, and changed the name of his band to the Ike & Tina Turner Review.

Tina's voice is raw and packed with energy. I'm searching for equivalents at the time and not yet finding much.  The first that comes to mind is the classic 1961 debut, At Last!, by Etta James, but that is drenched in controlled and sultry blues, and putting TT against EJ is like putting Janis Joplin against Aretha Franklin. There is, of course, Shirley Bassey, who has a powerful voice, though her 1961 release, Shirley Bassey, is all pop-jazz strings and smooth control. And there are girl groups such as The Shirelles, whose 1961 album, Tonight's The Night, covers R&B and doo-wop, so is closer to The Soul, but it is very mannered and pop-orientated.  Aretha Franklin's debut album, Aretha, was released in 1961, and that is R&B, and Franklin has a powerful, soulful voice. Though Aretha is rather poppy, controlled, and mild mannered compared to The Soul.  Other R&B and soul based girl groups such as The Crystals,  and others, have some similarity, but all lack that raw energy.  Big Joe Turner's band (Rides Again 1960) has some of the swing and kick of Ike's band, but lacks the raw energy, and Big Joe doesn't have Tina's powerful voice. For nearest comparisons I'm looking at male singers. There's James Brown, slower, but with the swing in the band, and the raw, but controlled, power in the voice - Please Please Please (1959).  And Jackie Wilson, He's So Fine (1958), expressive, powerful, energetic, breathless.  And Little Richard - Here's Little Richard (1957).  And Jerry Lee Lewis - Greatest (1961).

Too many of the songs are plain and combined with a sometimes indifferent approach by band and singer tend to let down the album.   But it's still a fascinating document of the emergence of such a raw singing talent. 

 "A Fool In Love" on TV (1960)    (1965)   

Wikipedia
RateYourMusic
AllMusic
Score: 10


Ike & Tina Turner's Kings of Rhythm Dance (1962)

This album appears to have been released under three different names: Ike & Tina Turner's Kings of Rhythm Dance;
Ike & Tina Turner's Kings of Rhythm Band; and Dance with Ike & Tina Turner's Kings of Rhythm. Despite the name, this is just Ike and his band doing instrumentals. It's a funky little album, but there's no Tina, so it's of limited interest.

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AllMusic
Score: 1

Dynamite (1963)

This is similar to Soul, and has half (six) of the same recordings, which makes this album largely redundant to the debut.

Wikipedia
AllMusic
Score: 3


Don't Play Me Cheap (1963)

Tina is trying to sound more like a jazzy blues singer such as Etta James; she is putting sophistication into her voice, though now and again she lets her voice loose. The result is an uneven and inconsistent album which is overproduced with strings all over the place.  The debut, Soul, is better.


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Wikipedia
AllMusic
Score: 4

It's Gonna Work Out Fine (1963)

There's a confidence and assuredness on this their fourth (third and a 1/2?) album, though it's still a bit patchy. However the meld of girl-group doo-wop, R&B, and soul with Tina's raw voice is quite compelling. There is an attractive energy about the whole album that overcomes many of the flaws. A decent album, and a good point to start, but on balance - because it was the debut, and it contains the song that started it all, I still prefer Soul. Hmmm, but I think I enjoy hearing this one a bit more.....

Wikipedia
AllMusic
RateYourMusic
Score: 8


Ike & Tina Turner Revue Live (1964)

Ike & Tina were known for their live performances, and videos available of some of their concerts does show that they had energy, excitement and sexuality in plenty. This is the band's first live album, and takes its cue from James Brown's Live At The Apollo (1963) which also had a six minute melody including  "Please Please Please", but Brown's is better.  I can't find the album online, just the first track. I found a live TV clip from the same period, but it's a song, "I Can't Believe What You Say", that's not on the album, and which only has Tina up front - no Ikettes.  Ah, I got this - "All In my Mind".  And "All I Could Do Was Cry/Please Please Please".  And "My Man (He's A Lovin Man)".  And "He's Mine".  And "Treat Me Right". And three live versions of  "Fool In Love" from around the same period: TNT ShowShindig, and Hollywood A Go Go.  Interesting to note that the skirts were longer at this time. Ike revealed in an interview that he had been asking Tina to wear shorter skirts, but it wasn't until they toured in support of the Stones in London that he bought them all mini skirts.  From what I have been able to piece together, this is a great live album, displaying the strengths of the band.

AllMusic
Score: 8

The Soul of Ike & Tina (1964)

The Soul Of.... is a Kent record label album which can't be found on the internet, but a 2000 compilation of the Kent recordings does contain most of the album - the tracks are "Goodbye So Long" /  "If I Can't Be First"  / "Chicken Shack"  / " I Don't Need"  / "I Wish My Dream Would Come True" / "Hard Times" / "It's Crazy Baby" / "Gonna Have Fun" / "Am I A Fool In Love" / "Something Came Over Me" / "Hurt Is All You Gave Me" / "Don't Blame It On Me"
This dry stuff compared to the live album. It's like they are rehearsing, and lack the commitment and involvement of a live show.  The material here is OK, nothing great.  Indeed, most of their material during these early years is simply OK, slightly derivative of what's around (though that is very common throughout the history of music, art and commerce!), and not really doing anything new or special. It's not the material that really counts, it's the performances, and here the performances are revealed as very weak compared to what they can do live when the adrenalin is flowing, and there's no chance for a second take.

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Score: 4

The Ike And Tina Turner Show (1965)

The Ike and Tina Turner Show Vol 2 (1965)

This is a Loma Records two part release in 1965. Loma was an R&B subsidiary label of Warner Brothers who have recently re-released the two albums as one set on CD, adding "Live!" to the title. Volume 2 was recorded in Texas, and is the strongest of the two, but both feel rather casual and throwaway. Ike was not keen on recording contracts - he preferred single album deals with money up front, and did this with a number of labels with little documentation, so it's difficult to work out the order the albums come in - one book has Volume 2 appearing the year before Volume 1.

AllMusic
Score: 4


Get It - Get It (1965)

A 1965 or 1966 studio album on the Cenco record label.  The complete album is not available on the internet, but some tracks are: Get It - Get It / I Believe / "I Can't Believe (What You Say)" (video) / "My Babe" / "Strange" / "You Weren't Ready" / "That's Alright" / "Rooster" / "Five Long Years" / "Things That I Used To Do"
The sound is bluesy and jazzy rather than R&B and soul. 

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Score: 5

River Deep - Mountain High (1966)

This is Ike & Tina's most famous album. For many people it's the only album they know by the pair.  The title track, "River Deep - Mountain High",  is a classic. It's pure Phil Spector with Tina Turner's vocals, and is a step sideways from what Ike & Tina had been doing together. The rest of the album is an oddity as it's a mix of Phil Spector and Ike Turner working with Tina, so at one point we're in wall of sound pop, then gritty R&B and then back to pop. Some of Ike's contributions are re-workings of songs they've done previously, and it's each to their own as to if the 1966 version of "I Idolize You" is more enjoyable than the 1961 "I Idolize You".  For me the 1961 version blows the 1966 version out of the water. Tina is controlled in 1966, aware that her voice has power, and using it to create an impression, in 1961 she fucking lets rip and its a force of nature, raw, primaeval, awesome, and very rare. By 1966 she's going through the motions, aware she has a strong voice, and she'll continue to do that the rest of her career, but here at the start she's the real deal, and everything is open and before her, she she has no choice, she's either gives it everything or she has no career - there's no going through the motions, this is total and utter commitment.  It's the same for "A Fool In Love" - this 1966 version is something easy to overlook so false is the emotion generated, and so stagy are the shrieks. While, poorly recorded and produced though it is, there's no mistaking the raw power and utter commitment of the 1961 "A Fool In Love", the song that launched her career.

Tina, Phil Spector, and Ike, together in the studio

What many people "know" about the recording of this album is that it's Phil Spector's album, and that he paid Ike not to be involved. That is not true. The album is not Phil Spector's, as he abandoned the recording sessions after the single "River Deep - Mountain High" failed in America, so Ike finished it off. Spector didn't pay Ike to stay away - he simply asked Ike if he could record with just Tina, and Ike agreed, provided that the name Ike & Tina Turner was used, which, as they were still signed to Loma Records, meant that Spector had to pay $20,000 to Loma to hire them.  When it came to recording Tina, Spector couldn't handle her properly, so nothing happened during the first session, and Tina brought Ike along for the next session, where she managed, after several takes, and having to take off her blouse,  to lay down the vocals that Spector wanted. But, hey, don't let truth get in the way of a good myth, huh?

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Wikipedia
AllMusic
Pitchfork
Musoscribe
Popdose
WorldOfTina
Score: 6

In Person Ike & Tina Turner and Their Ikettes
(1968)

A live album recorded for the Minit Records label.  The album includes solo performances by The Ikettes.

"Everyday People" (by the Ikettes) / Gimme Some Lovin' / Sweet Soul Music / Son Of A Preacher Man / "I Heard It Through The Grapevine" / Respect / Medley: There Was A Time-African Boo's (by the Ikettes) / Funky Street / A Fool In Love (by the Ikettes) / Medley: The Summit-All I Could Do Was Cry-Please, Please, Please-Baby I Love You / Goodbye, So Long
(recorded live at Basin Street West, San Francisco; MC: D.L. Herb Campbell)

It's competent but unspectacular.  Some of the arrangements are a little too fussy, and don't compare well with the simpler and more powerful arrangements of the early Sixties.

AllMusic
Score: 4

Outta Season  (1968)

Most sources have this as being released in 1969, but the record label shows that it was 1968 on Blue Thumb:



It's quite a bluesy album - well presented electric blues. But, as with most Ike & Tina studio material since their debut, it's casually thrown together. There's a distinct lack of effort and commitment. The duo are competent and talented enough to get by and produce something quite listenable, but there's nothing here that stands out. Nothing enduring. And nothing to recommend others listen to. Having said that, I find it likeable and very listenable. "Motherless Child"  and "Dust My Broom" give a good flavour of what's on offer.

RateYourMusic
AllMusic  This review is attached to the name and song list of this album, but what the reviewer says bears no relation to this album, as there are no soul or R&B numbers - it's all electric blues. It doesn't sound like a collection of singles - indeed, there is probably more unity in this album than in most Ike & Tina albums. And it hasn't been deleted. As evidence, I'm using the version on Spotify, and as Discogs shows, the album was in print in various covers and in various countries through the Seventies.

Score:  7

So Fine (1968)

This is the first of three albums for the Pompeii record label. Best track is "It Sho Aint Me", and the rest of the album is listenable, but nothing special. As usual, compare this 1968 "Fool In Love" with the original "Fool In Love".  Nuff said. Let's move on.

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AllMusic 
Score: 5


Cussin', Cryin' & Carryin' On (1969)

The second studio album for Pompeii. This is the So Fine album plus some instrumentals.  Move on.

RateYourMusic 
Score: 3


Get It Together (1969) 

Third Pompeii album.

"Too Hot To Hold" / "I'm Fed Up" / "Make 'Em Wait" / Poor Little Fool / You Got What You Wanted / Freedom Sound / Bet 'Cha Can't Kiss Me (Just One Time) / So Blue Over You / Cussin', Cryin' And Carryin' On / Beauty Is Just Skin Deep / Ain't Nobody's Business / Funky Mule

I can't find the album, so I'm looking for individual tracks, but I'm giving up because what I'm finding is earlier versions of the same songs.  Tracking down an accurate record of what Ike & Turner produced is not easy as they made so many records, albums and singles, live and studio, on so many different labels, and would reuse the same material several times. Sigh.

AllMusic
Score: 3


Her Man...His Woman  (1970)

Get It - Get It! / I Believe / I Can't Believe (What You Say) / My Babe / Strange / You Weren't Ready / That's Right / Rooster / Five Long Years / Things That I Used To Do

A re-release of  Get It - Get It (1965) with a different cover, title and record label.

Score: 3


The Hunter (1969)

Quite bluesy in a similar style to Outta Season, though with more funk, resulting in a Stax sound.  Quite decent and workable, especially the title track, "The Hunter", written by the Stax house band: Steve Cropper, Booker T, etc.  "Bold Soul Sister" is a copy of Sly Stones "Sing A Simple Song".  It's a decent album, but it's not cutting edge, and while the songs are enjoyable, there's nothing outstanding or memorable.

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AllMusic
Score: 8


Come Together (1970)

Credited to Ike & Tina Turner and The Ikettes, this is Ike & Tina's first rock album (with a few R&B numbers).  Mostly songs by Ike, though they cover "Come Together",  "Honky Tonk Women", and "I Want To Take You Higher". As always since the debut it's all very nicely done, but lacking in authenticity. The covers are done pretty much note by note - competent, but pointless.


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Score: 8

Workin' Together (1970)

After many years of trying, they finally put together a successful album. This is their commercial and critical peak. They blend together all they have acquired over the years - pop, rock, R&B, funk, soul, blues, into a big, professional and very competent whole. "Goodbye So Long" is a damn fine song. Even the covers have an edge missing in their previous covers. "Get Back"  crackles with energy, while "Proud Mary" is widely acknowledged as their best ever cover, drove the success of the album, and propelled Ike & Tina into the big time. 

AllMusic
RateYourMusic
Score: 9 1/2

'Nuff Said (1971)

A mix of funk and rock, creating quite a groovy sound with Tina in full flow and control of her voice. This is not the awesome rawness of the wonderful debut, but a performer who knows what to do with her voice to create a compelling raw energy without actually laying bare her soul and throat. This is good stuff with band and singer delivering quality stuff bang on with the times, flirting with country rock on "Pick Me Up", but empowering it with soul and funk. There's some bloody good stuff here.


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AllMusic
Score: 9 1/2

Live In Paris (1971)

The studio albums were getting more contemporary, but the live performances, as indicated by the album, were still stuck in the "Chitlin Circuit" style of revue, blatantly copying James Brown's revue style from the early Sixties with such introductions as "the hardest working young lady in show business today". The first three tracks are sung by the Ikettes before Tina comes on. It's hard to believe this is actually from the Seventies. Being there would have been fun, as the show was colourful and lively, as shown in this video from around the same period, but the album falls a little flat.

Score: 4 1/2


What You Hear Is What You Get
- Live At Carnegie Hall (1971)

Similar to Live In Paris, with the same set up  - The Ikettes come on and do some numbers, then Tina comes on and finishes off the show, though a few songs are different.  Some of the songs that are the same, for comparison: "Respect",  "Higher",  "Proud Mary", and "Honky Tonk Women" at Carnegie.  "Respect",   "Higher",   "Proud Mary", and "Hony Tonk Women" at Paris.   For me the Paris show just edges the Carnegie show.
Score: 4

Feel Good (1972)

I originally thought this came after Let Me Touch Your Mind, but the label numbers show that this was released first. This contains eight Tina composed songs, the remaining two being covers. This, as far as I can tell, is the first time she had contributed songs by herself (unless she was using her elder sister's name, Aillene Bullock, for her own compositions), and the album sounds quite modern in comparison with the stuff they were doing live. It's quite upbeat and poppy, though still with one foot in the R&B sound. At times it's hard to separate this from solo Tina material. This is the beginning of the end for the Ike & Tina Turner Revue, though it would take a few more years before Tina decided to split off on her own.  


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AllMusic
Score: 5 1/2

Let Me Touch Your Mind (1972)

Alongside the covers, and a song by Ike, are three songs by Tina. One of the songs. "Popcorn", is suggestive of "Nutbush City Limits". This album is similar to Feel Good, and another sign that Tina was heading out the door, but on the whole a fairly flat album, without the energy of Feel Good

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AllMusic
Score: 4

Nutbush City Limits (1973)

This contains Tina's hit song "Nutbush City Limits" (this is a live version), as well as five other songs by her.  I can't find the album on the internet. This is the complete song list:  "Nutbush City Limits" / "Make Me Over" / "Drift Away" / That's My Purpose / "Fancy Annie" / "River Deep, Mountain High" (1966 and1973 versions) / "Get It Out Of Your Mind" (scratched vinyl) / "Daily Bread" / "You Are My Sunshine" (scratched vinyl) / "Club Manhattan"

The "Nutbush City Limits" sound is well used throughout the album to the point of complete exhaustion, and none of the other songs match the power of that song. "Nutbush" is a great song, but the rest of the album makes for uncomfortable listening.

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Score: 2 1/2

The World Of Ike & Tina (1973)

A live double album.  Track list: "Theme From Shaft" / I Gotcha / Intro To Tina / She Came In Through The Bathroom Window / You're Still My Baby / Don't Fight It / Annie Had A Baby / With A Little Help From My Friends / Get Back / Games People Play / Honky Tonk Women / If You Love Me Like You Say (You Wouldn't Treat Me Like You Do) / I Can't Turn You Loose / I Wish It Would Rain / Just One More Day / Stand By Me / Dust My Broom / River Deep Mountain High / Let Me Touch Your Mind / Chopper / 1-2-3

I can't find the album or even any tracks from it. I put in a few live tracks from the same period just to give a flavour of the album.  Everyone does a professional show, and the band are tight, and it would have been an entertaining show if you were there. But this is clearly a band just going through the motions, and the live act doesn't translate well on a single album, let alone a double.

Score: 2


Sweet Rhode Island Red (1974)

Track list: Let Me Be There / Living For The City / I Know / Mississippi Rolling Stone / Sugar Hill / Sweet Rhode Island Red / Ready For You Baby / Smooth Out The Wrinkles / Doozie / Higher Ground

Usual stuff - this sounds like competent session musicians going through the motions with poor self-composed songs that are trying to recapture the excitement of "Nutbush". The covers are generally the better things on the album

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Score: 2 1/2


The Gospel According to Ike And Tina (1974)

A gospel album. Ike's singing is quite dirgy, and the Stevie Wonder style synths don't work with gospel. This is a very thin album, and even Tina's voice can't really save it. The wrong approach was used, and an opportunity missed - badly.

RateYourMusic

Score: 1 1/2



Delilah's Power
1977

Airwaves
1978

Black Beauty


Tina Turner solo albums 

Tina Turns the Country On! (1974)
Acid Queen (1975)


Rough (1978)

Tina's first solo album after she and Ike split up. It's a tentative collection of rock/pop/disco songs. Nothing that strong. The tongue-in-cheek cover of Elton John's "The Bitch Is Back" is the most spirited contribution. Neither the album nor any of the singles released from it made any impact. Tina's singing is raw and rocky in an appealing raspy manner, and she controls it well. It's the voice that will prove commercially successful later on when she finds the right material. Here, apart from "Bitch", it's the material that lets her down. 

AllMusic: 6 
Score: 4 

Love Explosion (1979)
A competent commercial album, but no tracks stand out. Just going through the motions.

Wikipedia
AllMusic: 5
Score: 3


Private Dancer (1984)

Oooh. Right from the off this stands out as a crisp and confident production. And the material is strong. Even the cover has a stylish and iconic confidence to it compared to the casual throwaway covers that have gone before. Credit for the album's success can be given to John Carter, who saw potential in Tina, despite her patchy history and poor recent record sales, and persuaded his record company, Capital Records, to sign her, and then proceeded to assemble quality material, producers, and session musicians, and oversee the whole project. The album produced seven successful singles including "Private Dancer" and the global hit "What's Love Got To Do With It". Slick, yes. Far removed from the raw power of her 1961 debut  "A Fool In Love", yes. But there is much to be admired in the English sophisti-pop sound of the album, and the way that Tina confidentially uses her voice. She has the power, and she has the control. And she has experience and sophistication. It's a different sound, and should be admired and appreciated for what it is.


Wikipedia
AllMusic: 9
Score: 8


Break Every Rule (1986)

This feels and sounds like the runner up to a successful album - let's try and recreate the same sound! It worked before, so it should work again!  Of course it sold, because follow up albums always do. And people loved Tina, so they swallowed it whole. But it doesn't work. It hasn't got the same tightness, the same energy, nor - despite using a lot of the same collaborators - does it have the same quality material. This feels like so much of Tina's history - decent talent just going through the motions.

Wikipedia
AllMusic: 6
Score: 3



Tina Live In Europe (1988) 
Double live album trawling through tours between 1985 and 1987 and dragging in big names here and there - Bowie, Clapton, Bryan Adams, etc. Tina released loads of live albums when with Ike, and they generally had a sense of energy and focus; this is a lifeless collection. Quantity does not equal quality. The best tracks are the cover of  "Addicted To Love" (which succeeds because it's a good song and survives the inept guitar solo, the lumpen rhythm section, the cheesey sax break, and Tina's over-straining vocals), and a high energy blast through her own "Nutbush".

Wikipedia
AllMusic: 4
Score: 3




Foreign Affair (1989)

Strong album which doesn't attempt to copy Private Dancer, but follows its own route. And does it well. "Steamy Windows" is a bold and attractive opener, sounding like a cross between Mark Knopfler and JJ Cale. And is then followed by one of her most successful singles, "The Best". Much of the slick pop-jazz of Private Dancer has given way to something more earthy and adult on this album, though still keeping an eye on the crowd with a pleasing pop sensibility and a lack of anything that might have too narrow an interest. MOR rock with a broad appeal is what this is. And it's done rather well. Very likeable.


Wikipedia
AllMusic: 6
Score: 6


What's Love Got to Do With It (1993, soundtrack)
Wildest Dreams (1996)
Twenty Four Seven (1999)


Ike Turner solo albums


Live videos:

1960s
1969 
1970s


Full discography 

Albums ranked
* Robert Christgau
* Wilson&Alroy 
* Buyer's Guide



556  March 2019

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